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U.S.- ASEAN-10 Trade and Investment Facts

U.S. goods and services trade with ASEAN countries totaled $241.7 billion in 2013.  Exports totaled $100.5 billion; Imports totaled $141.2 billion.  The U.S. goods and services trade deficit with ASEAN countries was $40.7 billion in 2013.

The United States has $206 billion in total (two ways) goods trade with ASEAN countries during 2013.  Goods exports totaled $79 billion; Goods imports totaled $127 billion.  The U.S. goods trade deficit with ASEAN countries was $48 billion in 2013.

Trade in services with ASEAN countries (exports and imports) totaled $36 billion in 2013.  Exports were $22 billion; Services imports were $14 billion.  The U.S. services trade surplus with ASEAN countries was $7 billion in 2013.

According to the Department of Commerce, U.S. Goods and Services exports to ASEAN supported an estimated 499,000 jobs in 2013 (365,000 from goods exports and 134,000 from services exports).

Exports

  • U.S. goods exports to the ASEAN countries in 2013 were $79.0 billion, up 4.7% ($3.6 billion) from 2012, and 75% from 2003.  U.S. exports to the ASEAN countries account for 5.0% of overall U.S. exports in 2013.
     
  • The ASEAN countries, together, would rank 4th as an export market for the United States in 2013.
     
  • The top 5 ASEAN export markets in 2013 were Singapore ($30.7 billion), Malaysia ($13.0 billion), Thailand ($11.8 billion), Indonesia ($9.1 billion), and Philippines ($8.4 billion).
     
  • The top export categories (2-digit HS) in 2013 were: Electrical Machinery ($15.6 billion), Machinery ($10.5 billion), Aircraft ($9.9 billion), Mineral Fuel and Oil ($5.1 billion), and Optic and Medical Instruments ($4.8 billion).
     
  • U.S. exports of agricultural products to ASEAN countries totaled $10.7 billion in 2013.  Leading categories include:  soybeans ($1.7 billion), dairy products ($1.3 billion), wheat ($1.1 billion), cotton ($923 million), and soybean meal ($909 million).
     
  • U.S. exports of services to ASEAN were $21.5 billion in 2013, down 6.9% ($1.6 billion) from 2012, but up 93% since 2003.

Imports

  • U.S. goods imports from the ASEAN countries totaled $127.0 billion in 2013, up 3.3% ($4.1 billion) from 2012, and up 55.1% from 2003.  U.S. imports from ASEAN account for 5.6% of overall U.S. imports in 2013.
     
  • The ASEAN countries, together, would rank as our 5th largest supplier of imports in 2013.
     
  • The top 5 ASEAN import suppliers in 2013 were Malaysia ($27.3 billion), Thailand ($26.2 billion), Vietnam ($24.7 billion), Indonesia ($18.9 billion), and Singapore ($17.9 billion).
     
  • The five largest categories in 2012 were:  Electrical Machinery ($30.8 billion), Machinery ($17.8 billion), Knit Apparel ($11.0 billion), Woven Apparel ($7.3 billion), and Rubber ($6.0 billion).
     
  • U.S. imports of agricultural products from ASEAN countries totaled $9.5 billion in 2013.  Leading categories include:  rubber and allied products ($2.2 billion), tropical oils ($2.0 billion), processed fruit and vegetables ($781 million), coffee (unroasted) ($759 million), and tree nuts ($697 million).
     
  • U.S. imports of services from ASEAN were $14.2 billion in 2013, up 0.9% ($133 million) from 2012, and up 180% since 2003.

Trade Balance

  • The U.S. goods trade deficit with ASEAN was $48.0 billion in 2013, a 1.1% increase ($503 million) over 2012.
     
  • The United States had a services trade surplus of $7.3 billion with ASEAN countries in 2013, down 19% from 2012.

Investment

  • U.S. foreign direct investment (FDI) in ASEAN countries (stock) was $204.0 billion in 2013, up 9.1% from 2012.
     
  • U.S. direct investment in ASEAN countries is led by the nonbank holding companies, manufacturing and finance/insurance sectors.
     
  • ASEAN countries=  FDI in the United States countries (stock) was $20.8 billion in 2013, up 5.8% from 2012.
     
  • The distribution of ASEAN countries FDI in the United States is not available.

ASEAN countries include Brunei, Burma, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam.

NOTE: Refers to private services trade not including U.S. military sales, direct defense expenditures, and other miscellaneous U.S. government services.  Services trade data includes all ASEAN countries expect Burma (Myanmar), Brunei, Cambodia, Laos, and Vietnam