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North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA)

U.S. exports to Canada and Mexico support more than three million American jobs and U.S. trade with NAFTA partners has unlocked opportunity for millions of Americans by supporting Made-in-America jobs and exports.

As the U.S.’ two largest export markets, Canada and Mexico buy more Made-in-America goods and services than any other countries in the world. Since NAFTA’s implementation, U.S. states like Illinois, Ohio, Michigan, and many others have seen a surge in exports across North American borders. 

Some Facts on the NAFTA and…

NAFTA and American Jobs  

For over 30 out of the 50 States, Canada or Mexico rank as the first or second largest  export market. Many American small business exporter’s first foreign customers are in Canada or Mexico and under NAFTA, U.S. trade with Canada and Mexico have supported over 140,000 small and medium-sized businesses.



NAFTA and Manufacturing

Since its entry into force, U.S. manufacturing exports to NAFTA have increased 258% and the United States maintains a growing manufacturing trade surplus with Canada and Mexico. American exports of computer and electronic products, furniture, paper, and fabricated metals have all more than tripled since NAFTA implementation.



NAFTA and the Trans-Pacific Partnership

The Trans-Pacific Partnership allows us to bring NAFTA into the 21st Century for the benefit of working families in America. Following the great progress in U.S. trade policy since NAFTA was implemented, the TPP will help the U.S. address environmental challenges like wildlife trafficking and illegal fishing, respond to new developments in global trade, such as the growth of the digital economy, and reinforce the U.S. commitment to upholding cutting-edge labor and environmental standards to level the playing field for American workers.


NAFTA and the Trade Balance

For services and many categories of goods, the United States maintains a trade surplus with the NAFTA countries.The largest factor affecting the trade balance with NAFTA countries is the importation of fossil fuels and their byproducts. If those products are excluded, there is no deficit. In fact, the United States has a large and growing trade surplus in goods, including agriculture and manufactured goods, as well as in services.

NAFTA imports have increased the competitiveness of American businesses. Nearly 60 percent of US total goods imports from Canada and Mexico are used in the production of Made-in-America goods and services.